Monday, October 29, 2018

Making green fuel from crop residues

We Are The World Blogfest
There are various residues or leftovers that remain after the harvesting of a crop. Since they don't have any use in that form, most farmers burn them, leading to huge environment pollution.

However, those residues can be further processed to obtain what are called biofuels. But it needs some investment and it is not an easy process.

Recently, I chanced upon a news item in The Indian Express that spoke of a startup formed by two enterprising farmers in Punjab. This crop residue management company is called Farm2Energy, and they make biocoal with residue from crops
of paddy, sugarcane and corn. Biocoals are environment friendly fuels that can be substitutes for coal, wood, and other conventional fuels.

It is really heartwarming to see such environment-friendly business initiatives being undertaken. And more such activities can make our world a better place to live in.

(This post was submitted to the 18th edition of the We Are The World Blogfest, which seeks to promote positive news. This is the Facebook page of WATWB.)






12 comments:

  1. What a wonderful thing. I hope it does well so that those residues are no longer burned.

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    1. Yes, Liz. It's good that there are many initiatives in this direction.

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  2. Hi Pradeep - those two farmers are hugely enterprising and must inspire many around them and now us here too - thanks for letting us know about them. Anything not to let unused material go to waste makes so much sense ... they seem to be on to a good thing ... thanks for sharing - Hilary

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    1. Thanks, Hilary. Good to see such work catching on.

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  3. thanks for sharing about farm2energy, it's a good initiative for biomass supply

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  4. Thanks for stopping by my site!

    My farmer father always plowed under all crops' remaining roots and stalks. He said that this would enrich the soil.

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    1. Thanks, Susan for the comments. Good to know that.

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  5. Good idea, hope they get good support to implement it. But, there is one issue with biofuels - if it becomes too profitable, farmers tend to ignore food crops and grow crops exclusively for biofuels!

    Destination Infinity

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    1. Yes, Rajesh, that's what I am too hoping.

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  6. Fascinating! Thank you for sharing.

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