Tuesday, May 22, 2018

Usher in new ideas, and accept them

Everything around us is changing at a fast pace. Forget 50 years ago, even 20 to 30 years ago, the world was so different.

While technology has made our lives easier, there are plenty of depressing things happening. There is no end to violence and killings; there are many instances of financial deceits; and physical intimidation, covert and overt. There is a lot of suffering and pain undergone by people, because they have been wronged.

In such a situation, it's only natural that many of us could be despondent; depressed with the new ways of the world, as it were. To pull our spirits up, we need to cut through this negativity; and keep reminding ourselves the good old phrase: 'Every cloud has a silver lining'.

The 50+ age group

Though pessimistic and cynical people can be found in any age group, there are many in the above-50 age bracket, for the simple reason that they have a long past to feel good about. There are many old people who keep saying, "In those days .... ", or "When we were young ... " The subtle hint in those statements is: "The past was better than the present."

I have also heard some old people making comments such as: “Look at this generation, How disorganised and careless they are. Moral standards and value systems have taken such a beating ...” These are people who find it hard to adjust to the different value systems of the younger generation.

About a month ago, some of us friends were having a discussion on how bright, smart and enthusiastic youngsters are today; and also on some of the successful startups (from Facebook to some lesser known ones) that are headed by young people. Then an old person amongst us, in his late sixties, made a comment that was very sarcastic, belittling the youngsters.

He said, “We struggled so hard for years together to reach the positions that youngsters are enjoying today without much effort." His complaint seemed to be: “I had to suffer so much, but these kids are having it so easy.” (But the fact is that youngsters are also putting in a lot of effort to be successful.)

Needless to say, such an attitude is not encouraging at all. Actually, it reeks so much of negativity.

Need to stay positive

I am not saying that everyone who is above 50 is low-spirited. There are so many people in that age bracket who are so cheerful and brimming over with positivity. They have so much of hope and trust in the youngsters.

One example of this was the gentleman whom I saw in the metro train recently. I blogged about him  last week.

There might be downsides, but in many ways, today's world is far better than what it was in the past. The youngsters may have different value systems and priorities. It might not be always possible to relate to the new dynamics. It might be also difficult to agree with everything that youngsters say and believe in. But that doesn't mean, all of us are hurtling towards disaster.

Change is inevitable

I think we should give space to the new ways of thinking, and new models of working and lifestyle. Afterall, as someone once said, 'the only permanent feature is change'.

Let us also not forget that when we were younger, our way of thinking was different from that of our parents' generation. So, it is only natural that the norm today is different from what it was many years ago.

As Alfred Tennyson wrote in Idylls of the King, "Old order changeth yielding place to the new."

Let us accept and embrace change.

20 comments:

  1. Agree with you absolutely. Older people have this attitude problem - I suffered a lot in my younger age and so should you. My point is if you have to walk 10 km every day to go to school, why should i also have to suffer. This happens in every country. My older colleague in my office told me it took him 20 years for him to come to this level and i made it in 12 years. I told him to F off.

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    1. Thanks, SG for the comment. It might be also something to do with insecurity of older people?

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  2. The "good old days" weren't necessarily so great. And we don't know exactly what the young people went through to get where they are today. We see our own rough drafts but we only see final products of those around us. We may have had it easier, only we wouldn't know that.

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    1. Yes, even younger people have to struggle, Thanks Liz.

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  3. The pace of change,especially on the technological front, is so fast that some of the older generation finds it difficult to keep up.In a couple if decades from now, things wiuld be far more different bringing in its wake some social upheavals. The change nevertheless would be inexorable. A nice post

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  4. Hi Pradeep - good to see you posting. I will reply to the post in a second! But the next #WAWTB comes up on Friday ... here is the link to Damyanti's blog with the details:
    http://www.damyantiwrites.com/

    Life changes as has happened through history ... as long as we are polite, empathetic to those around us, thoughtful and kind towards others ... and not be selfish: think of the other side of the coin (i.e. the opposite approach) ... people are negative: across the generations ... but we can all be of a positive attitude. Hope to see you Friday - like the metro man! Cheers Hilary

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  5. I totally agree with all your points and recently gave a speech about having an Ageless Attitude to life. In the speech I mentioned the importance of having an open mind and that we can learn from those younger and older than ourselves. Thank you for linking up and sharing with us at Midlife Share the Love Party and I look forward to reading your contribution next week.
    Sue from Sizzling Towards 60 & Beyond

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    1. Indeed we can learn a lot from the youngsters, Sue.

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  6. You are so right Pradeep - there are easy things for younger people today but they also have more to deal with than we did when we were their age. There was no internet or FB - there were less comparisons with "beautiful people" leading "perfect lives". Jobs were simpler with less technology. I'm happy being my age and having lived my life up til now - I wouldn't swap with anyone younger than me - even if they do have it a bit easier at times!

    Thanks for linking up with us at #MLSTL and I've shared this on my SM xx
    Leanne | www.crestingthehill.com.au

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  7. As a septuagenarian, I do hear those same negative comments from contemporaries. While there are times I yearn for the simpler days when I grew up, I also acknowledge the wondrous advancements we have today.

    A simple comparison - while my husband and I love the look of the classic cars of the 50's, they drove like tanks. There was no power steering, no power brakes, no power windows, no sun roofs, no FM or satellite radio - I could go on and on. Heck, we thought we were hot stuff when the 60's brought 8-track tapes into cars!

    Great post...#MLSTL visitor

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    1. So true, Donna. Thanks a lot for dropping by and for your comment.

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  8. I don't know if things are easier for young people or just different. Each age has its own set of problems and changes.

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    1. Yes, Victoria. Every generation has its own challenges as well as comforts. Thanks for dropping by.

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  9. Interesting observations. I'm 62, and though I feel despair and fear about our political situation in the US, I still have hope, especially in young people. I don't think they have it that easy. Both of my grown children are working very hard.

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    1. Hi JoAnna, fully agree with you. I think the feeling that the young people are having it very easy is a misconception. Thank you for dropping by.

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  10. I feel, our current generation thinks that life is better because we are yet to face the consequences of our actions. Getting money quickly doesn't shield us from other issues like lifestyle diseases, etc. that also reach us younger.

    Destination infinity

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