Monday, July 5, 2021

Fully vaccinated

Image source: Pixabay

I am now fully vaccinated. I got the second dose of Covishield yesterday. 

That's the very popular Indian version of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine manufactured here by Serum Institute of India, the world's largest manufacturer of vaccines.

I took the first dose on April 9.

Earlier, the gap between the two shots of Covishield was smaller, I think between 28 and 45 days. Later, in the face of a massive shortage of vaccines, the government widened the gap to 84 days.

The other popular vaccine in India is Covaxin, a completely Indian product manufactured by Bharat Biotech. The gap for this continues to be a minimum of 30 days.

AT APARTMENT COMPLEX

I took the jab at a vaccination camp held in our apartment complex. A remarkably smooth process.

All that we had to do was carry our personal identity document and the code that was generated when we registered for vaccination on the government portal CoWin

The hospital personnel at the site upload the particulars to the portal and soon after the vaccination, we get a message from the government's Health Ministry stating that we have govt vaccinated. From the portal, we can also download a certificate.

Incidentally, the Indian government is holding a global conclave later today on leveraging technology in vaccination management.

ADDITIONAL COST

Many resident welfare organisations and private companies are taking such initiatives in partnership with private hospitals, which is a good move, considering that it increases the number of people who are inoculated.

The cost is a little higher though. I paid ₹1,100, while for the first one at a private hospital, I paid ₹750. 

The extra cost, over and above the government-stipulated price, is presumably for the favour of coming over to our residential complex, something that everyone would appreciate since it's risky to go to a hospital in these times. 

Some private hospitals agree to send vaccinators to even residences, but again at an extra cost.

The government on June 8, issued an order capping the maximum price for Covishield at ₹780, for Covaxin at ₹1,410 and for Sputnik V at ₹1,145.

The vaccination is free of cost at government hospitals and public health centres. The local corporation is not quite enthusiastic about coming over to residential premises.

ROLE OF PRIVATE HOSPITALS

I think for a large country like India, it's perfectly okay for the private sector to be given some leeway to manage such massive operations. So that the government resources and money can be channelled to the people who can't afford the cost. After all, nothing comes for free.

A positive outcome of the active involvement of the private sector is that a large number of people, who can afford to pay the cost, do get vaccinated, and thereby slowing down the spread of the coronavirus.


26 comments:

  1. Hi Pradeep - I had the Astra Zeneca vaccine ... and had the 90 days space ... they've decided here that a break of 3 months is the best, rather than shorter time frames - but I understand each country (and each vax organisation) will be somewhat different. It is likely in the Autumn we'll be getting a flu jab in one arm, and a top-up Covid jab in the other arm ... starting with the elderly - me!

    We need to continue to be careful ... is all I think I'll say - stay safe and am glad you and the family are vaccinated and are well. All the best - Hilary

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  2. Hari OM
    congrats! And I think what you say about the role of smaller private hospitals taking up some of the load this way makes a lot of sense. The logistics were challenging enough here - in India that takes on an exponential load! YAM xx

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    1. Hi Yamini - The large size and high population density of India, makes it all the more challenging. Luckily, everything is falling into place, after the initial hiccups.
      I heard, the UK will relax considerably the restrictions from July 19. That's quite a long way off for us here.

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    2. Hari OM
      Not the UK - England. Scotland and Wales (dunno about NI) will be more cautious. The cases are speedily on the rise again and although hospitalisation and deaths are relatively low, there is still significant disease and disruption from it. Johnson is living in lala land... Yxx

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  3. Very informative blog post. Here in California, I had Pfizer vaccine. Took the first dose on Feb 8 and second one on March 4. My insurance took care of the cost. I did not know how much it cost. It was smooth and I had no side effect. Covid-19 Vaccination Record Card was issued to me by CDC (Center for Disease Control).

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  4. Here in California, you don't have to wear a mask in department stores if you are vaccinated

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    1. Hi Rajan - Pfizer is now considered among the best vaccines, and I think in the US it's mostly that.
      Ya, in many countries, the insurance covers it. That's good.
      I think in the UK from July 19, masks won't be mandatory.
      Here in India, that's a long long way to go.

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  5. I'm getting my second shot Friday! I'm glad you're vaccinated. Hopefully more people keep doing the same.

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  6. Yay for the 2nd shot. I had my 2nd 28 days after my first. By the time I was up, they had figured out how to get things moving as to getting doses out to people. It took some time to ramp up the vaccination process, though.

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  7. Good to know. But i think we need to be cautious even after vaccination...

    Destination Infinity

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    1. Hi Rajesh -- yes, absolutely. We can't be complacent.

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  8. Good to know you are vaccinated safely at your aptt. complex itself.

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    1. Hi KP - That's quite convenient and safe too.

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  9. been safe for several months. nice

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    1. Hi Pam - That's nice. The big challenge for India is the large size and the high population density. However, things are getting better, albeit slowly.
      Do take care, and stay safe.

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  10. I also got both of my shots, and if need I would get a booster.
    Coffee is on and stay safe

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    1. Hi Dora - That's good. I did hear about the booster shot. But I not sure for which type of vaccine it's recommended.
      Thanks. Take care.

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  11. If it works to get more people vaccinated more quickly then it seems to me to be a good thing.

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    1. Hi David - You are right. That should be aim.

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  12. Yay! Good for you! I recently heard that 40% of my province in Vietnam is vaccinated, but I assume that happens on a tiered basis. I've heard nothing about any availability for expats yet.

    I follow the Covid statistics regularly, and have noticed that India's recent surge seems to be slowing a bit. It makes my heart happy.

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    1. Hi Red - Yes, the situation is getting better in India. Vietnam also went through a surge, I heard. I guess it's now better.
      Thanks. Take care.

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  13. I pray that you and yours are staying healthy, and those throughout your nation. Be well, dear.

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  14. Great! I had my second shot on the 29th. Thankfully, after the vaccine shortages have eased up, the process is quite smooth. We did have some anxious moments with getting my husband's on time.

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    1. Hi Corinne - It'll get better with time. The vast population is a challenge. So, it'll take a while. Thanks.

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  15. Hi Pradeep - I missed this post. Glad to hear that you're fully vaccinated. With the number of cases in India I think it's a very wise decision. My husband and I are waiting things out as we have no travel plans and there are no community cases in Western Australia (and there have actually only been a handful since this whole covid thing started). We're waiting for the vaccine to be continued to be developed and fine tuned (and to see the long term implications) before diving into something that neither of us are keen to have injected into our bodies without the disease being present anywhere near us. Time will tell if we've made the right decision, but if I was in India or the UK I'd definitely be rolling up my sleeve for a dose!

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